Kiss and Don’t tell (until the end) – why I love romantic mysteries

Clare Chase’s fast-paced and thrilling romantic suspense novel, You Think You Know Me, is out in e-book format today. Read about her love of mysteries and the inspiration behind the novel here on Choc Lit corner. Happy Publication day, Clare! 🙂

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To me, asking if I’d like mystery mixed with my romance is like asking if I’d like a glass of wine with my chocolate.  Either one alone is wonderful, but if I’m allowed to wolf down both at once, I’m a happy woman. Each genre brings its own tension, intrigue and pulse-racing moments, and a mix of the two is a powerful combination.

I also really like the puzzle element. I love not knowing what hidden motives a character might have, and what secrets lie in their past. If I can’t sleep, I find wondering ‘whodunnit’ in the book I’m reading a lot more fun than counting sheep.

Not knowing who to trust ratchets up the tension for the protagonist too. In my novel, You Think You Know Me, the heroine, Anna, is faced with this dilemma. She feels an immediate and powerful connection with a man she’s just met, but finds within hours that he’s given her a false name. Torn between backing off and allowing him to explain, she gets drawn into a dangerous and unstoppable drama.

Romantic mystery is a classic sub-genre, and I was introduced to it quite young, when I first read Daphne du Maurier’s Jamaica Inn. I found it unbeatable: a passionate love story tightly interwoven with intrigue and danger.

Evocative settings mean a lot to me too. Du Maurier’s use of wild moorland was perfect. For my own story, set in the run-up to Christmas, the build-up takes place against the fast-moving backdrop of London, but the denouement makes use of the lonely beauty of the Lakes.

Once I’d got bitten by the romantic mystery bug, I lapped up Mary Stewart’s novels. Meanwhile books like Jilly Cooper’s Bella had me turning the pages so fast I ripped them. But the male thriller writers were just as inclined to pepper their stories with romantic intrigue. I remember finding Dick Francis’ novels quite educational on that front, when I first found them on my grandmother’s bookshelves.

Romantic mysteries are also the stuff of Hollywood, of course, from classics like Hitchcock’s Rear Window, (and indeed, Jamaica Inn), to the unfolding relationship between Jason and Marie in The Bourne Identity.

Sometimes the mystery is very much bound up with the romance, and resolving one leads straight on to the happy ever after in the other. But other authors follow relationship hurdles that are separate from the central plot. Nora Roberts, writing as JD Robb, uses this format in her novels about Detective Eve Dallas and her partner Roarke.

Like the books in its umbrella genres, the romantic mystery comes in many forms, but one thing it always promises is escapism and excitement. Wonderful though everyday often life is, I think there’s a huge benefit in that.

Twitter: @ClareChase_ 

Website: www.clarechase.com

Facebook: Clare Chase author page

Buy You Think You Know Me HERE today.

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Check out the awesome book trailer for You Think You Know Me here:

 

12 thoughts on “Kiss and Don’t tell (until the end) – why I love romantic mysteries

  1. Oooh, I love a bit of mystery with my romance. Loving you cover, too, Clare. Read Window is my all time fave Hitchcock film, btw. Huge Congratulations! 🙂 xx

  2. I’m another huge fan of romantic suspense – Rear Windows remains a firm favourite so off to buy your book now 🙂

  3. Mary Stewart is one of my favourite authors too. I’m really looking forwards to reading your novel, Clare. The trailer’s terrific too – very evocative music.

  4. A brilliant trailer, Clare! Congratulations on your publishing success. On my TBR pile now!

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